Gingerbread Greenhouse: Final Reveal

Here it is, in all it's glory. The gingerbread greenhouse! This was a marathon of a baking project. We went little by little, but when I think back, it certainly took a considerable amount of time!

One of my favorite parts about this house is how there is interest on the inside and out; peering into the greenhouse through the front door or the vented window recreates some of the mystery you feel when looking into a life-size greenhouse. The light passing through the windows invites you to look inside and see all of our teeny tiny plants. 

Everything we used to make the house is edible, except for the base, which is a cookie sheet covered in foil. For the outside decoration I added piping and candy edging, made from mini m&m's, and spicedrops. The ground has some coconut snow, and Nilla Wafer dirt, as well as Nilla Wafer Stepping stones. I added my favorite brazil nut stone wall to the lower half of the greenhouse, and some raised beds in the yard, and a little potted plant props the door open in the front. 

Thank you for reading a long with us this year! We hope you've had an excellent holday season; we're ready to start of 2016 with a bang!

Greenhouse Inspiration: UW Botany Greenhouse

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Over the Summer we were able to go on a tour of the greenhouses at the University of Washington. As expected the inside was full of amazing colors, textures and things that you may have a hard time believing is a plant. Greenhouses that you pass on a daily basis always have a little extra mystery to them; you can get glimpses of what could be inside but never really know until you get to go inside and look up close.

When we were making the greenhouse gingerbread house, we definitely used some of the details that we saw in the greenhouses as inspiration for the plants that we created for inside the greenhouse. We were lucky to get the chance to tour the greenhouse, because UW is in the process of building a new facility, so we were able to get some of that history that we love so much in the Logee's greenhouses. 

This one is in an academic setting, so there isn't as much of the neat overgrowth as there is at Logee's, but what it lacks in disheveled majesty it makes up for in unique specimens. The plants have had a long time to grow and each room has specific temperature and humidity profile. Its really a 4-D experience to walk into a room and not only see the amazing plants but immediately feel the affect of the heat and moisture. The diversity of the plants makes so much sense when you can approximate the conditions that it would naturally grow in.

I think our next trip will be to the Conservatory at Volunteer Park, which we hear is pretty spectacular. What greenhouses have you seen and would recommend a visit to?

Greenhouse inspiration: Logee's

This year we decided to take on a pretty big challenge in creating a Gingerbread house in the shape of a Green house. Before we do the big reveal we want to share a couple of the greenhouses that we've seen that inspired culinary version that we made this year.

Logee's is one of the most special man-made places I have ever been; of course it has had an awful lot of help from plants. Logee's Greenhouses are in Danielson, Connecticut and exist as an arm of their retail store. You can also buy plants  from them online or through their catalog, but plopped down in Connecticut are 5 greenhouses that are filled with great plants.

TERRACOTTA Pots ENGULFED by a root ball

TERRACOTTA Pots ENGULFED by a root ball

 Logee's specializes in unique plants, and walking up and down th aisles is a one of a kind experience. Textures and layers of plants in every color and type will greet you on your explorations around their William Logee opened his greenhouse in 1892 and started collecting plants. Some of those plants are still in the greenhouse from the early days (think 1900) and add to the ambiance and the lush feel that can only come from plants that have been around for a long time and have had a chance to fully engulf the space that they are in.

I had quite a collection of Logee's plants that I gave away when we moved and I never see those types anywhere else. Since we moved, they are dispersed to many of my friends and I hope they are enjoying them as much as I did. If or when we move back east I am going to make a beeline back to Logee's for the wave of feeling you get in prescence of old, amazing plants, and take home a carload!